Art, reviews and thoughts from a young artist in Plymouth, UK.

Archive for the ‘Thoughts’ Category

The House of Marbles

Yesterday I went to the House of Marbles in Bovey Tracey with my local home-ed group.  The House of Marbles has galleries of marbles and old pottery, a glass shop filled with artwork made in the building’s own glass-making workshop, and giant marble runs.

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Curriculum Vitae marble run by Alex Schmid

The marble runs by Alex Schmid are hypnotic to watch.  My favourite is Curriculum Vitae.  The marbles are lifted to the top of the run by a chain then let go on to the track.  I counted at least five different routes the balls could follow, including loop-the-loops, staircases, and counterweight trebuchets.  The marble runs are all made of thick wire welded together and the name of the piece, the year it was built and Alex Schmid’s initials are spelled out in the metal body of the marble runs.

Upstairs there is an enormous marble run, the biggest in the UK, called Snooki.  This one uses snooker balls and includes staircases, trebuchets, and a Newton’s Cradle.  There are also sections where you can’t see the ball but can hear it whirring round a funnel or rolling down inside a pipe, it is exciting waiting for the balls to reappear from these parts

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Some of the marbles on display.  I like the eyeballs and the printed designs.

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I really like the glittery swirls on the left of this picture.  They remind me of ocean waves.

The marbles gallery contains hundreds and hundreds of marbles and there is a lot of information about the different types, materials, and the methods of making them.  I learned that people have been collecting and playing with marbles for centuries and that they have been made from clay, steel, stone, glass, and precious rocks.  There are several different types of marbles, including Clambroth (striped swirls on creamy background), End of Day (made with “grits” which are leftover bits of glass), Sulphides (a clear marble with a clay figure in the centre), and Clears and Opaques (single colours).  Some of the materials used to colour glass marbles include Gold, Copper, Cobalt, Silver, and Uranium and the swirls and spirals inside some marbles are made using coloured glass canes.

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Tiny glass animals made in the House of Marbles glass workshop.

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Watching glass birds being made by glassmakers in the glass workshop.

The shop selling Teign Valley Glass has tons and tons of beautiful pieces of art made out of glass.  There are glass apples, birds, vases, and glass bowls that look like sea foam and waves.  Each piece is made right there in the workshop and is a unique object, and the whole room is full of colour.

There were glassmakers making small glass birds while we were there, and we watched them work for ages.  First, one glassmaker would put a glob of glass onto the end of a large metal rod and heat the glass up in the pot furnace until it was glowing orange.  He then rolled it in coloured powdered glass, then fused it all together in the pot furnace again.  He did this several times with two different colours.  Next, he used a pad of wet newspaper to shape the glass into the bird’s body.  He then took a pair of tweezers to stretch out a bit of the glass to make the bird’s tail.  Finally, he spun it around a few more times in the pot furnace and used the tweezers again to pull a smaller part of the glass out to make the bird’s beak.  The process was mesmerising to watch and it made me think about how much effort and time is put into making glass art by hand.

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“Do what you can, Being what you are, Shine like a glow worm, If you can’t be a star”

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“K stands for Kindness”

In another room at the House of Marbles is an exhibition showing the history of the Bovey Potteries.  The first thing I saw was a scale model of the potteries as they used to be.  All around it are cases full of pottery that was made there or found nearby.  There are a lot of different types of pots and cups with inspirational messages written on them, and little clay figurines.  Much of the crockery is decorated with detailed and pretty patterns, and I’ve taken pictures of these so I can experiment with the patterns at another time.  There is a lot of information on cards throughout the room, and a short video about the potteries’ history.

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I really liked this clay diorama of a person making pottery in a clay oven.

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A cat produced by Wemyss Ware.  I love how it has a cute but slightly creepy look.

The House of Marbles was fascinating and seeing all the different kinds of artwork has definitely given me some inspiration, and I haven’t even seen everything that’s in there yet!  There is a whole section on board games that I didn’t have time to explore.  Hopefully I’ll be able to visit again sometime soon, and I recommend a visit to anyone interested in marble runs or local history.

100 Ways To (be) Home Ed

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About Me

I am Kitty and I am a young artist in Plymouth.  I am also home educated and I am writing this post about myself and about what it is like to be a home educated young person for the #100waystohomeed bloghop.  The last post was at Never The Same Two Days Running and the next post will be by @thepndmonster.

I have never been to school but most of my friends do go to school and we have lots in common.  We like a lot of the same things, like going into town, chatting to each other, and watching Netflix together.  We also study some of the same subjects, like English and Art.  We all have to work and study and do housework at home, the main difference in our lives is that in school my friends have to do specific subjects according to a set timetable, whereas I have a choice of what I want to study and my timetable is quite flexible.  So for example while they go to school every Monday to Friday (in term time) from early morning to late afternoon, some days I don’t do a lot of study and instead I play games or go to events and exhibitions or maybe just hang out with other home ed friends.  However, on busy days I might work from the morning until late evening, I often have work to do at weekends, and for me school holidays are usually even busier than term time!

Another thing I have in common with young people who go to school is that we all have goals in our lives, like going to college or university, having a career we enjoy, and growing up to be happy and satisfied adults.  My own goals are to study Graphics, Illustration and Game Arts at Plymouth College of Art, to sell my artwork and meet lots of other artists and illustrators, and to find work in concept and character design in the video games industry.  Just like young people in schools, I have to work hard so that I can achieve my goals, but instead of focussing on GCSE exams in lots of different subjects, as a home educated person I can focus my time on building the skills I enjoy and I know I will definitely need.

I don’t tend to study different subjects every day, but I do have things that I do most days.  On a typical day, for example, I start with working on my art skills.  Starting with drawing helps me warm up to the day and to relax.  Usually I will do a 30 minute character sketch in pencil from my imagination or following a prompt (I like using artprompts.org), or I work on a previous sketch, inking it or colouring it.  After that, I work hard on my English Language study, because I have an assessment coming up at the Art college.  This is quite hard because although I think I have okay English skills (I read and write a lot!) I am not used to working towards an exam or having to answer those sorts of questions.

I spend quite a bit of the rest of my day doing art things, for example I work on projects to learn new techniques like printing, linocutting and costume making.  I do a lot of sketching in my sketchbooks (I have several which I use for different purposes), and I follow online courses and books full of tutorials.  The online courses I am following at the moment include one on drawing backgrounds, one on pixel art, and another on figure drawing and human anatomy.  The art books I work from and study include Keys To Drawing, Making Comics, and Urban Watercolor Sketching.  I think I probably spend a few hours most days either doing art or reading about art, and I follow other artists and illustrators on Twitter and Instagram to see what they are doing and to participate in online projects like #inktober and #dailysketch.  Studying art includes studying history, culture, anatomy, technical skills with different materials and software, psychology, and all sorts of other subjects.

I also try and keep track of current events and read articles especially anything to do with art and games, and especially local things like what the college is doing, or exhibitions and events that are happening.  I like to take part in things that are happening in Plymouth and its important to me to support local artists and to be part of the community.  I write about some of the events and places which I go to on this blog but I go to so much more than I have time to write about!  In the past few weeks I’ve been to a contemporary music concert, a performance by a folk band, an Open Day at the arts college, an exhibition of ‘upcycled’ skateboards, an exhibition about the Titanic, the Eden Project, a vintage toys exhibition, an exhibition about plastic dumped at sea, and more.  Today is Sunday and later I am going to a research performance where the audience will influence the soundtrack.  Going to all these different events expands my view on the world and what is possible as an artist.

Most days I also read fiction, at the moment mostly I am reading comics and manga but I do enjoy novels as well, especially funny ones.  I listen to music (all sorts, from game soundtracks to Britpop to Japanese pop and metal) and I practice playing my guitar.  I chat to my friends and if I can’t see them in person we talk online using Skype and Whatsapp.  At the end of the day I try to always write a bit in my journal and sometimes I read or draw in bed, or watch a film.  My About Me illustration at the top of this post gives more details about the things I enjoy.

As well as all this, every week I go to kickboxing twice (I have earned my Junior Black Belt!), I have either a guitar or a drum lesson, and I go to a local coding/tech club for young people.  I also go every week to a home ed activity group and a home ed social group, I’m a member of the National Art & Design Saturday Club and I go to two Youth Clubs.  I’m quite busy most days!  I don’t see myself just as a student but I also think of myself as a working artist and blogger and I hope to help the organisations and adults I meet to take young artists and writers seriously and see how we are part of the community too.  Although I do work hard at art and writing this part of my life can be really difficult as I am quite shy in person and often I am the only (or one of a small number) of young people at an event.  I can struggle with what to say as I worry about saying something that will be embarrassing    whereas when I am blogging or tweeting I have time to think and edit before I say something.  I take a sketchbook everywhere I go and that helps because if I’m nervous I can draw and that comforts me.

I could write so much more about the things I do as a home educated young person.  For example I also am learning to make games using Scratch, I am learning about electronics and coding using my Shrimp and Raspberry Pi, and I am trying to start a band!  I participate in game jams and create and publish video games with my brother.  I go to comics and science fiction conventions and I like to do cosplay.  I play with my little sister and sometimes we draw together, and I am used to spending time with kids of all different ages in our home ed groups.  My life is so full, but I do make time to relax and see my friends.

I hope that reading this has helped give an insight on what it is like to be home educated.  In some ways of course it is different to going to school but that doesn’t mean that we don’t study or have social lives.  We all have goals and worries just like any other young people, and we all have interests and are passionate about them.  If any other home ed young people are reading, please add me on Twitter or Instagram, and if you are a young artist in Devon or Cornwall add me too and maybe we can meet up sometime!

THANK YOU FOR READING!  Please remember to check out the other blogs on this bloghop and learn more about how different families do home education.

NA&DSC London Trip

On the 19th of November I went with my National Art and Design Saturday Club on a coach trip to a Welcome Day for all our groups at Central Saint Martins college and the Tate Britain gallery.

At 6am our coach was in front of the old Plymouth museum.  I found a seat next to a friend and chatted while we waited for the rest of the group.  It was my first time on a coach and it had soft seats with buttons to make them recline and red curtains in the windows.  We set off at 6:20 and me and my friends were excited but tired from being awake so early.  A lot of my group slept for the first part of the journey but after we stopped at Exeter services to stretch our legs and get some snacks almost everyone stayed awake.  We had another five hours or so of travel ahead so we talked about visits that each of us had made to London in the past and told each other funny anecdotes from our lives.  I did some sketching trying out different character faces but my lines were a bit wobbly from the movement of the coach, and I kept dropping my rubber down the side of the seat.

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Character sketches I made on the coach

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I did these sketches of Marvel characters in pencil on the coach and added the ink and watercolour later.

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This is what my pencil sketch of Quicksilver looked like before inking.  I did this one for my brother and Skyped it to him back at home.

As we travelled through London we took pictures out of the coach windows and pointed out buildings we recognized, like the Gherkin, MI6 and Big Ben.  Our coach dropped us off close to Central Saint Martins and we walked the rest of the way.  Central Saint Martins is a huge building and we noticed that the inside room was so vast that it was almost as cold as it was outside.  We were given stickers to wear to show we were from Plymouth College of Art and ‘perylene maroon’ goodie bags from Cass Art.  In my bag I had an A4 sketchbook, some pencils, a bottle of water and some snacks.  We sat down to have some lunch while our student ambassador Ben played on a piano and we waited for some of the other groups from around the country to arrive.

After lunch we looked at all the other self-portraits from the different groups and a photographer took a picture of us in front of our own portraits.  It felt amazing to have my self-portrait up in a gallery with other young artists’ work.  There was a lot of variety in the style and techniques used in the portraits I saw.  One group, from the Victoria and Albert museum, had used concertinaed paper with two portraits drawn on it so the one that you could see depended on the angle you viewed it from.  Some of these were quite creepy to look at because one side would be a regular portrait and the other side looked strange or demonic.  Other groups had worked with print, photography, pencils or collage.  My group used acrylic paint on pieces of wood and I wrote about that process in a previous blog post.

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My PCA sticker (stuck to my usual sketchbook), and my new grey sketchbook and perylene maroon bag from Cass Art

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The Plymouth group photo with our self-portraits and goodie bags, posted by @natsatclub on Twitter.  I am on the left in the front row.

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My photo of our self-portraits hung in Central Saint Martins.  Mine is the third from the left on the bottom row.

After looking around the portraits all the groups were shown into a large room for a series of talks.  We learned that even though there were hundreds of us there that day we only represented a third of the total members nationally!  Some groups were so far away they couldn’t make it together and so one family had come alone.  Those of us from Plymouth spent at least 12 hours travelling to London and back that day!  We heard from Cecilia Weckstrom who told us that when she was younger she didn’t know what she wanted to study, and got an apprenticeship with a children’s book company and learned about graphic design, and now she works for Lego and is a Trustee for the NA&DSC.  The director of the Saturday Club Trust, Sorrel Hershberg, and Jeremy Till, the Head of Central Saint Martins, both gave us information about the Saturday Arts Club and thanked the founders Sir John Sorrell and Lady Frances Sorrell.

When we came out of the room, ginormous pieces of paper were rolled out for us all to draw on and there were people holding big buckets with tons of crayons, pens and pencils for us to use.  My group didn’t have a lot of time before we got back on the coach but we sat on the floor for a short while and I drew my friend and myself.  There were a lot of cool doodles and there were tons of kids drawing each other.  After that I bought myself a big red NatSatClub hoodie and we got back on the coach for the next part of our trip.

All the groups headed to different venues around London and mine headed to the Tate Britain gallery.  We got a short tour around a few of the pieces of art on display and our tour guide and our tutor Kate encouraged us to talk about and critique what we saw.  We studied each piece for a few minutes and tried to think of single words that described how we felt or the impression we got from the artworks.  One piece that I found intriguing was Fiona Banner’s Break Point which is a huge canvas painted white with red marker pen text describing a chase scene from the movie Point Break.  The shade of red that she used and the way the text got closer together towards the bottom of the piece made me tense and it seemed very aggressive.  I haven’t seen the film, but I hope to soon so I can see what happens next!

We moved on to the Turner Prize 2016 Exhibition.  The Turner Prize is a contemporary art award given every year to a British artist chosen from four nominees.  My favourite piece on display was an installation by Michael Dean which was a pile of pennies equal to one penny less than its title, United Kingdom poverty line for two adults and two children: twenty thousand four hundred and thirty six pounds sterling as published on 1st September 2016.   Me and my friends thought it would be fun to roll around in it all.  It sounds like a lot of money but it didn’t feel like it when I saw it as a pile of pennies.  There was an enourmous gold sculpture of a butt by Anthea Hamilton called ‘Project For Door (After Gaetano Pesce)’ and people were laughing and taking silly photos near it.  I thought it was absurd in a funny way.  Visitors were invited to write their thoughts about the exhibition and pin them up outside the gallery, so we did that and then left to make the long trip home.

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My sketches of my friend on the left and myself on the right surrounded by other young artists’ contributions to the big drawing papers

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Me at home in my hoodie

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Michael Dean’s installation

On the journey home I took some more pictures of London lit up at night, and everyone was wide awake and in the back someone was playing music.  It was such an exciting day, me and my friends ended up having laughing fits for ages for no real reason.  We stopped at services to get dinner, but we panicked because we thought we had taken too long but it turned out we were back before most of the group.  We settled down eventually and it got quieter and some people fell asleep, and I carried on working in my sketchbook.  We got back to Plymouth at around 11 and I was exhausted.  The whole day was absolutely amazing and I’m really thankful to have had the opportunity to be part of it.

National Saturday Club Part 1

This post is going to cover what I did during the first half of autumn term at the National Art and Design Saturday Club at the Plymouth College of Art.  My tutor is Kate Marshall.  Kate is an artist who works in all sorts of media and enjoys experimenting with unusual materials from the sites she is researching.  Our student ambassador is Ben Lintell.  Ben is a student at PCA studying Contemporary Crafts and he creates paper and glass sculptures.

During the first half term we were working with self-portraits and figure drawing.  We started with drawing our self-portraits with paper and pencil.  I used a mirror and something I found difficult was that any small movements I made would throw me off.  I worked entirely in HB pencil because that was all I had with me that day.  I think I captured my expression pretty well but I think I could have made it more realistic if I used different pencils.

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Next we were given a square of wood each to draw another self-portrait on.  I’ve never drawn on wood before and it was hard to erase the pencil marks so I had to use less working lines than usual.  I worked from a photo of myself on my phone this time and it was slightly easier than from a mirror, because there was no movement and I could zoom in to investigate details.

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I then started painting my self-portrait on the piece of wood with acrylic paints.  Kate advised us not to use one colour for our skin as that would make it look fake, but to look closely for blues, greens and other hues.  I studied my photo and found lines, shadows and different shades of pinks, browns, greens and blues.  I mixed up the different colours on a palette and used two different brush sizes, a medium-sized flat one for covering bigger areas and a slightly smaller round brush for details.  I wasn’t able to find a very small brush for fine detail.  I don’t normally work with acrylic paints but I enjoyed testing them out.  Acrylics are opaque and not transparent like the watercolours I normally use.  I watered my paints down a little to make them easier to use and I noticed that when I used colours on top of a layer of white they were more vivid.

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Our self-portraits were put on display in Central Saint Martins in London alongside other National Saturday Club groups from around the country.  Here is a photo of all the portraits from the Plymouth College of Art group:

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We also spent a session speed-drawing each other in different poses and holding or wearing different costume items to practice figure drawing.  I did some using my 4B graphite stick and some using charcoal.  The charcoal is darker and has a more textured line whereas the graphite gave a smoother line.  I found that both allowed me to be more expressive and use bigger gestures than when I use a pencil.

I really enjoyed drawing the different poses and body shapes and found that our quick drawings sometimes didn’t even look human.  I want to do a lot more figure drawing as it will help me improve my character design and comic art. I’d also like to do some life drawing lessons but I haven’t found any classes locally that will accept students of my age yet.  I’ve signed up to an Udemy course on Anatomy for Figure Drawing (I got this discounted and there are sales quite often on Udemy) and I have been drawing poses from magazines.

Below are some of the sketches I’ve done recently from photos in my NEO magazines.  I have been doing very quick sketches of body frameworks using simple lines joined by small circles for joints, and bigger shapes for heads and body sections.  I saw this technique used to show figures in action in How To Draw Comics The Marvel Way by Stan Lee and John Buscema.  It is a good way to investigate poses and movement.  In some places I have used coloured pencil to add more details later.

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In this last picture I made up my own poses from my imagination and memory.  I feel that my skills have already begun to improve because of this exercise and the work we’ve been doing at the Saturday Club.

 

 

Plymouth Art Weekender Day 3

The 25th of September was Day 3 of the Plymouth Art Weekender.  Here are links to my earlier posts about the event: Day 1 and Day 2 (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3).

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My little sister on the merry-go-round at Union Street Party 2016

Day 3 was a Sunday so we relaxed in the morning then headed to the Union Street Party, where last year I took part in my first public participation art project “Painter Pitcher” (organised by Amy Whittingham), with my brother and my dad.  That was a lot of fun and I was looking forward to seeing what was happening at the party this year.  The flyer for the Weekender said there would be a print workshop from Double Elephant and I really wanted to give that a try as I have seen their workshop leaflets at PCA in the past and they look really interesting.

We arrived as a band was setting up on the main stage and a woman from the We Are Plymouth booth asked if we wanted to take part in their photo project to celebrate Plymouth’s people and communities.  Me and my brother were given a small whiteboard to write “We are Plymouth” on (I added a doodle of my own!) and a badge each to wear for our photo.  Unfortunately we didn’t take a photo of our own because we thought they would be posted online but their Instagram account is empty!

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Instructions and ticket for Marcella Finazzi’s installation at Sloggett and Son, and my We Are Plymouth badge

We carried on walking around and had fun messing about on a bouncy castle and a rodeo bull.  Next to the bouncy castle were two men playing music with a guitar and drums and they were encouraging members of the public to join in. We watched a woman singing an Elvis song and a few young boys taking turns on the mic and drums, and there was a really great atmosphere around this part of the Party.  Right next door was Sloggett and Son, a shop that sells vintage furniture and they were hosting an installation of instant photos and sound recordings called “What we talk about when we talk about love” by Marcella Finazzi.  We got into line to participate and Marcella gave us a ticket and instructions on what to do.  We wrote about what love means to us on slips of paper and she took our photo for her album.  Being around all the vintage furniture while listening to to the conversations through the headphones made me feel like I was inside someone’s house and part of their family.  When we left we were given another slip of paper each with a ‘love thought’ printed on it.   Mine read “You look good today” and my brother’s read “I believe in you”.

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Instant photo of my family by Marcella Finazzi

We heard music and saw people dancing and went to watch for a few minutes then went into the Camper Obscura.  This is a camper van that has been converted into a Camera Obscura that you can sit inside!  We all went in and the man running the van closed the door to shut out the light.  We sat opposite each other on benches and he gave us a big whiteboard to hold flat on our laps.  He opened a hole in the roof with mirrors inside and the reflections of outside the van came in and were shown on the whiteboard.  We had to raise and lower it to get the picture in focus.  I loved this, it was a great experiment and I want to build my own camera obscura at home to better understand how they work.  After we came out the man took a polaroid of us to put on the door alongside pictures of all the other people who had visited that day.  I have my own Instant 1000 Polaroid Land Camera which I used last year for my Max Caulfield cosplay, I don’t know if it works but I am going to save up and get some film (there is a shop on the Barbican called So Perfect Images that sells it) to try out because I really like the way they work and the photos they make, and I’ve been really inspired by the different artists using instant film throughout the Weekender.

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Polaroid in development of my family by the man with the Camper Obscura

 

We looked up and down Union Street again and ate some delicious apples which we hand-turned into long spirals with a little machine, but we couldn’t find the Double Elephant workshop.  We were a little disappointed about that but otherwise we did have a really good time at this years Union Street Party, and I really liked all the different ways there were to get involved in the artworks happening there, however it was time to move on to our next destination.

We drove over to Devonport Guildhall for the Chrysalis exhibition of work by the artists from Flameworks.  All of the artists are making different things, from illustrations to metalwork and jewellery.  One of my favourite displays was “Teapotty” by Peter Heywood which was a selection of teapots made from different materials, including tea leaves, cubes of beech wood, lead, cocktail sticks, and chocolate.  The teapot made of cubes of wood made me think of 3D pixel art brought to life and there was something quite humorous about the collection.  I also liked “Resurrection” by Ati Charlesworth, a mixed media drawing of an old tree trunk with fresh branches and leaves growing from it.  The trunk was drawn with ink dots but Ati used watercolour and gold paint on the leaves and the new wood to bring it to life.  Another drawing I liked was “Shadow of a Previous Life” by Louise Rabey.  This was quite a sad picture based on a memory Louise had of a beloved pet who passed away when she was young.  There were lots more pieces of art on display here, my brother and sister’s favourite was “Salix II” by Piers Edsall which is a big steel musical sculpture with rods that the two of them made a lot of noise with!

Before we left the Guildhall we went downstairs to the cafe and I had a piece of treacle tart that had a layer of jam in it, and looked around Lynsey Johnstone’s exhibition “Floral Abundance”.  Lynsey works with acrylic paints, metallic paints, and glitter to make vibrant and colourful paintings which are full of life.

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Close up on “Summertime Magic” by Lynsey Johnstone

Our next stop was Devonport Live at 56 George Street but unfortunately it was closed, so we carried on to the Royal William Yard and the “Being Human” exhibition.  As soon as we entered we saw the “Participate” installation by Alain Pezard.  This was a collection of porcelain figurines which were quite unsettling, and some of them had been broken and stuck back together in creepy ways.  This has given me some ideas for things I would like to (un)make and it reminded me of Sid’s experiments from Toy Story!  I wish we had known about this piece beforehand because Alain had invited members of the public to bring in their own figurine and I would have liked to do that.

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“Participate” by Alain Pezard

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Creepy figurine holding her own head in Alain Pezard’s “Participate”

I found a lot of this exhibition quite alien to me because I haven’t experienced much fine art before.  Every piece of artwork was different to the other works on display, and there was photography, video, installations, collections, oil paintings, even performance works. I enjoyed another of Alain Pezard’s installations called “Water of the World”, which is a range of bottles of water collected and sent to him over 32 years by participants from all over the world.

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“Water of the World” by Alain Pezard

Another one of my favourites was “Devon Words” by Caitlin Hennessy.  Caitlin is interested in old words that are disappearing from our language as it evolves.  Caitlin talked to us about her research and the meanings of the words she had chosen were sometimes quite funny but sometimes there wasn’t a better word for what was being described, for example we found out that a ‘griggle’ is a small apple left on it’s tree!  I liked this piece so much I bought a small book of words hand-printed (and signed for me!) by Caitlin.

 

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“Devon Words” collected by Caitlin Hennessy

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A page from one of Caitlin Hennessy’s printed books of old words

Before we left RWY we popped into Martin Bush’s gallery of oil paintings.  Martin creates huge bright and warmly coloured abstract art inspired by jazz music and landscapes, and influenced by Matisse and Jackson Pollock.  Martin’s paintings are really beautiful and full of energy and we all really enjoyed our visit to his gallery.

And that was the end of my Art Weekender! I got to see such a wide variety of art but there were still exhibitions I couldn’t fit in, in particular I was sad that I didn’t make it to the Plymouth Arts Centre or the Karst Gallery.  I’m really looking forward to seeing more exhibitions by local artists at the next Plymouth Art Weekender in 2017 and especially finding out what opportunities there are for members of the public and young artists like me to experience being part of the creation of different artworks for the festival.

Plymouth Art Weekender Day 2, Part 3!

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For the last part of Saturday I went to Ocean Studios at Royal William Yard.  We started upstairs at Emerge which is “a communal workspace for artists and creative businesses.”  I looked at Esin Forster’s ocean inspired clay pieces and paintings, and I really liked her character design and marker work.  I looked through one of her sketchbooks and found comic style drawings of adventurous characters and they were full of energy.  I met Gabriella Van Der Stelt who was working on vivid and warm feeling acrylic paintings of fruit in bowls and buildings.  Gabriella was very friendly and I looked her up online afterwards, she also does manga and videogame influenced painting and drawing.  I really liked the open space of Emerge studios and can imagine how peaceful it must be to have an area like that to work in.

We went into Lisa Stokes‘ studio and talked to her daughter.  Lisa paints large oil paintings which are dark and ominous.  Along the corridor, Mary Hick does linocut printing of animals and insects.  Her work is intricate and she patiently carves out every blade of grass and hair.  Sarah Smalldon (instagram)and Shayne House share a studio where she works on her illustration work and he works on his photography.  Sarah showed us her brightly coloured and cheery pictures of houses and buildings, and her hand-decorated plates and furniture.  She primes the surface and then draws on them with Uni Posca pens.  I am going to try this on some of my own things and for cosplay.  Shayne has been working with pin prick photography and talked us through the process.  He takes photos and vintage postcards and pricks them with an awl to highlight certain parts, then places the photo on a lightbox and photographs them again.  He said he has been inspired by Amy Friend.  Pin prick photography gives a really beautiful effect and I recommend you visit his site and see his work, you can also read the backs of the vintage postcards he has collected to work on.  I also met Stella in their studio who is a young artist with similar tastes to me, and who I would like to meet again and maybe collaborate with.

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Items I collected on my visit, showing (clockwise from top left): Ocean Studios flyer; oil paintings by Lisa Stokes; mixed media on canvas by Teresa Pemberton; wire sculpture by Nikki Taylor; business cards from Martyn Cross, Annette Daly and Melanie Cassidy; jewellery by Rachel Darbourne; glass and concrete sculpture by Matt Tomas; and linocut print by Mary Hick.

There are so many other artists at Ocean Studios and many of them were happy to talk to us.  Matt Tomas works on contemporary sculpture, mixing concrete and glass.  He showed us the moulds he uses to create glass spikes.  Rachel Darbourne makes jewellery from colourful plastic sheets, similar to that used in plastic bags.  She folds and bends lots of tiny pieces to make shapes that look like carnations or coral, or Chinese dragon costumes.  She also makes art from dismantling teddy bears!   Teresa Pemberton is a mixed media artist whose work is inspired by Devon and Cornwall.  We looked at her canvases which included oil paints, wire, bits of metal and other found objects.  We didn’t meet her unfortunately but the two ladies in her studio were very welcoming, and her artwork has a sense of being welcoming and natural.

The last studio on the top floor we went to belonged to Martyn Cross.  Martyn works with unusual materials in experimental ways, and he has ironed plastic bags and shaped them into the shape of  a hat and a shoe.  He collects old knitting patterns, cuts parts of them away and rearranges them to create strange images.  I really liked his simple character drawings that were framed at the side of the studio.  Downstairs  Annette Daly and Melanie Cassidy share a glasswork studio where they make jewellery and decorations.  We quickly looked into a couple of other studios and glimpsed some acrylic paintings we liked by Mike Hanny, but the Studios were closing and so it was time to leave.  Looking online afterwards I found out that the paintings I liked are part of a series called ‘The Architects Glittering Plan’, and involve lots of patterned coloured ‘worms’ on a black background.  I would love a poster of one of these on my wall.

 

Outside me and my brother took part in a ‘sketch-a-thon’ and spoke to Nikki Taylor about her wire mesh sculptures.  Nikki uses sketches, photos and exact measurements to create life-size sculptures of human bodies in motion.  There was so much more I didn’t have time to see in the few hours I was there, as Ocean Studios is filled with all sorts of artists and craftspeople.  The Royal William Yard is a very peaceful place to be and I’d like to spend more time there.

In my next post I will write about the Union Street Party, the exhibitions at Devonport Guildhall, and the fine art exhibition also at Royal William Yard.

Links to previous posts on this years Weekender:

Day 1

Day 2, Part 1

Day 2, Part 2

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 Day 2, Part 2

Click here for my post on Weekender Day 1

Click here for my post on Weekender Day 2, Part 1

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The menu at Prime Cafe Bar

After a quick look around PCA we went to Prime Cafe Bar to see the Nomads exhibition  by Patrick Strode and Viktor Toth.  Patrick’s surreal illustrations felt lonely and I like how he uses colour.  In his comic page he mixed pinky-purple-orange watercolours for the background, in his other pictures on display he used just one colour for the background or made two spots of light, but everything else he left untouched.  I’d like to try this in my own drawings because his work is really striking.  I loved Viktor’s illustration of a woman in a dress wearing a headdress which looked like it was done with ballpen.  His pictures are dark and dramatic and seemed like they might be concept art for video games.  He also uses colour in confined areas, surrounded by shades of grey and black.

I had Rose Lemonade which tasted a bit like turkish delight, and a slice of banana toffee cake which was soft, squishy and delicious.  My mum had an iced mocha in a pretty glass and she says it is the best iced coffee she has had all year.  Prime Cafe Bar is a really nice space, it is comfy and there are shelves of books and games you can read and play.  We looked at a book about Japan and a Far Side book of cartoons.

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A photo showing the texture of Rebecca Williams Altschmerz (work in progress)

 

We moved on to the Fine Art Building of PCA to the exhibition Nothing Bad Will Happen.  We were greeted by Bethany Smiles who was showing her acrylic painting set Icons.  The objects on display were really diverse but seemed very personal to the artists.  For example,  Angela Hilton gathers discarded personal materials for her work, and I’ve Measured Out My Life In Coffee Spoons is a collection of 2 years worth of her own disposable contact lenses, stacked and hung from the ceiling on a piece of invisible thread.  My favourite pieces here were two acrylic paintings (one is a work in progress) by Rebecca Williams which were so filled with texture I wanted to stroke the canvas.  I also really liked Steve Brown’s political posters which I stopped at for a long time to try and examine every detail, and Sam Turner’s installation Form Of A Cyclical Construct which uses found containers and zip ties and made me think of a huge plastic dragon.

It was time for us to travel across town to Ocean Studios at Royal William Yard, and I will write about that in Part 3..

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