Art, reviews and thoughts from a young artist in Plymouth, UK.

Posts tagged ‘Kate Marshall’

Radius: 50mi at Ocean Studios

Last week I went to the third Home Grown exhibition at Ocean Studios, called Radius: 50mi featuring “contemporary jewellery and small scale metal artefacts”.  Multiple artists contributed to the exhibition.

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Necklace by Jodie Hansen

Jodie Hansen’s inspiration comes from nature and local scenery.  Her jewellery has a fragile, unique, and slightly eerie quality that is beguiling.

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Necklace by Tracey Falvey

Tracey Falvey’s inspiration is “drawn from sculptural and architectural structures” and she uses recycled silver.  I really liked the contrast between the dark or silver outside and the bright colours painted on the inside.

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Earrings by Maria Whetman

Maria Whetman’s jewellery uses clusters of hand-made jewels and shards of silver.  Her work seems dark and opulent.

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Jewellery by Rachel Darbourne

Rachel Darbourne “lovingly murders” cuddly toys and makes jewellery from the pieces.  Her work is grisly, playful, and highly peculiar.  I was lucky enough to meet Rachel at the Ocean Studios Open Day during last year’s Weekender.

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Artefact by Noah Taylor

Noah Taylor has a love of “things”.  He deconstructs objects made from brass, bronze, and copper,  then puts them back together to create new artefacts.  The finished products have an abundance of life and character, and remind me of the creatures in the film Return to Oz.

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Necklace by Stacey West

Stacey West’s award winning jewellery is inspired by found treasures and “the raw organic Cornwall coastline and rugged landscape”.  Her collection “Interlocking Strata” is tactile and interactive and encourages the wearer to play with their jewellery.

 

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Necklace by Katy Luxton

Katy Luxton is inspired by “mathematical models, geometric shapes, and the interwoven curves, circles and figures produced by a spirograph”.  She incorporates 3D printing and hand-dyeing to make colourful and exciting jewellery.

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Jewellery by Chloe O’Brien

Chloe O’Brien is inspired by discarded postcards “capturing this gentleness of the past to reflect and honor the beauty of these traditional forms of language, communication and handwriting”.  She cuts and reforms vintage postcards and postage stamps to look like precious stones.

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Jewellery by Peter Reeves

Peter Reeves is inspired by organic textures including tree bark and beehives.  I really liked his beehive ring which has a pattern of interlocking hexagons with a tiny silver bee crawling over.

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Jewellery by Victoria Sewart

Victoria Sewart’s inspirations for her work on display are “the aesthetics of form, structure and material composition” and the collection “investigates the properties of stainless steel mesh”.  Her jewellery looks like gold and silver ribbons trapped in time and movement.

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Jewellery by Nicola Hurst

Nicola Hurst’s inspiration comes from “architecture, simple shapes and everyday living”. Her work uses intersecting shapes and I think they resemble ancient symbols.

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Artwork by Sam Photic

Sam Photic is inspired by “the isolated Devonshire landscape and the continued encroachment of society upon it”.  His pieces of abstract work on display are metal squares and circles bolted together with strips of colour.  I think the central piece in my photo could make a striking album cover.

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Rings by Leigh Mason

Leigh Mason “references form, scale, texture and colour”. and her work has been featured in Vogue magazine.  I liked her unusual square-shaped rings with oversized pastel coloured gems.

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Jewellery by Ana Simoes

Ana Simoes is inspired by “the richness of Ana’s home country’s history, landscape and architecture, particularly by its connection to the sea and the unknown”.  Some of the work she had displayed looked like tiny planets and moons.

I really enjoyed this exhibition which was filled with so many different types of jewellery from local artists.  I am currently working on making jewellery with found seaglass and recycled silver with my National Saturday Art and Design Club at PCA led by my tutor Kate Marshall and this exhibition has given me lots of inspiration.

Read my post about Week 1 of the Home Grown exhibition here

Read my post about Week 2 of the Home Grown exhibition here

National Saturday Club Part 1

This post is going to cover what I did during the first half of autumn term at the National Art and Design Saturday Club at the Plymouth College of Art.  My tutor is Kate Marshall.  Kate is an artist who works in all sorts of media and enjoys experimenting with unusual materials from the sites she is researching.  Our student ambassador is Ben Lintell.  Ben is a student at PCA studying Contemporary Crafts and he creates paper and glass sculptures.

During the first half term we were working with self-portraits and figure drawing.  We started with drawing our self-portraits with paper and pencil.  I used a mirror and something I found difficult was that any small movements I made would throw me off.  I worked entirely in HB pencil because that was all I had with me that day.  I think I captured my expression pretty well but I think I could have made it more realistic if I used different pencils.

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Next we were given a square of wood each to draw another self-portrait on.  I’ve never drawn on wood before and it was hard to erase the pencil marks so I had to use less working lines than usual.  I worked from a photo of myself on my phone this time and it was slightly easier than from a mirror, because there was no movement and I could zoom in to investigate details.

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I then started painting my self-portrait on the piece of wood with acrylic paints.  Kate advised us not to use one colour for our skin as that would make it look fake, but to look closely for blues, greens and other hues.  I studied my photo and found lines, shadows and different shades of pinks, browns, greens and blues.  I mixed up the different colours on a palette and used two different brush sizes, a medium-sized flat one for covering bigger areas and a slightly smaller round brush for details.  I wasn’t able to find a very small brush for fine detail.  I don’t normally work with acrylic paints but I enjoyed testing them out.  Acrylics are opaque and not transparent like the watercolours I normally use.  I watered my paints down a little to make them easier to use and I noticed that when I used colours on top of a layer of white they were more vivid.

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Our self-portraits were put on display in Central Saint Martins in London alongside other National Saturday Club groups from around the country.  Here is a photo of all the portraits from the Plymouth College of Art group:

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We also spent a session speed-drawing each other in different poses and holding or wearing different costume items to practice figure drawing.  I did some using my 4B graphite stick and some using charcoal.  The charcoal is darker and has a more textured line whereas the graphite gave a smoother line.  I found that both allowed me to be more expressive and use bigger gestures than when I use a pencil.

I really enjoyed drawing the different poses and body shapes and found that our quick drawings sometimes didn’t even look human.  I want to do a lot more figure drawing as it will help me improve my character design and comic art. I’d also like to do some life drawing lessons but I haven’t found any classes locally that will accept students of my age yet.  I’ve signed up to an Udemy course on Anatomy for Figure Drawing (I got this discounted and there are sales quite often on Udemy) and I have been drawing poses from magazines.

Below are some of the sketches I’ve done recently from photos in my NEO magazines.  I have been doing very quick sketches of body frameworks using simple lines joined by small circles for joints, and bigger shapes for heads and body sections.  I saw this technique used to show figures in action in How To Draw Comics The Marvel Way by Stan Lee and John Buscema.  It is a good way to investigate poses and movement.  In some places I have used coloured pencil to add more details later.

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In this last picture I made up my own poses from my imagination and memory.  I feel that my skills have already begun to improve because of this exercise and the work we’ve been doing at the Saturday Club.

 

 

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