Art, reviews and thoughts from a young artist in Plymouth, UK.

Posts tagged ‘Plymouth Art Weekender’

Plymouth Art Weekender 2017 – Day 1

Last year I documented what I saw of the Plymouth Art Weekender, an annual city-wide art event where different galleries and venues open up to the public with temporary art installations made by artists based in Plymouth and abroad. It takes place over three days, and there are lots of exhibitions and events to enjoy.  This year, as an official blogger for PAW, I will try to cover as many of this year’s art installations as I can!

Today, I was part of an art tour surrounding We The People Are The Work, a project that “will explore ideas of power, protest and the public” and involves exhibitions by five sets of international artists in five different venues.  Each project involves working with the public in some way.

People who want to view the exhibitions can visit them individually but the curator Simon Morrissey suggested it is best enjoyed as a tour, starting at Peninsula Arts, then Plymouth College of Art, on to Plymouth Arts Centre, then the Council House, and finally to KARST gallery.

20170922_111823-816x612

Image depicting brainstorming for We The People Are The Work (PenArts)

We did our tour in a slightly different order, but still began in Plymouth University’s Peninsula Arts (PenArts) gallery, with a video installation by artists Antonio Vega Macotela and Eduardo Thomas called Advice From a Caterpillar.  The artists are from Mexico City and when they were approached to create a piece for WTPATW they researched Plymouth and decided to do a piece collaborating with extras who had been in the Tim Burton film Alice in Wonderland.  The piece features locations which appeared in the movie or that the actors wanted to talk about.

20170922_114100-816x612

Advice From A Caterpillar (PenArts)

Peninsula Arts also has the first of two big black walls called We The People Are The Words which the public are encouraged to write words or doodle on using the provided chalk.

20170922_114456-612x816

Cat doodle I drew with chalk in PenArts

We moved on to the second part of our tour, an exhibition in Plymouth Arts Centre (PAC) by Ciara Phillips.  The space has been transformed with new colours, shapes and patterns on the walls and large prints everywhere.

20170922_120914(0)-816x612

View of the cafe area in PAC from the ground floor

 

Parts of the gallery have been turned into workspaces with a darkroom, screen printing area, and a relaxing space for reading.  Every week new work will be created here by different groups of people working with Ciara, and that work will be added to the display changing the space over time, until the show ends in November.

20170922_121025-816x612

A higher view, this time of the same two prints and a small printing workshop (PAC)

20170922_121144-612x816

Screenprinted artwork (PAC)

20170922_121516-816x612

A small tent, as part of an art piece about anxieties and peace (PAC)

The second big black wall and chalk set is at Plymouth Arts Centre, and I drew another cat.

Resized pictures - 1.jpg

My cat in PAC

We moved on to the Council House which is not usually open to the public because it is still a working building, but the city museum have been negotiating with the council to be able to use it while the museum is being remodelled.  The piece here has been planned by artist Peter Liversidge.  Peter started with doing text generating projects with different members of the public, and the pieces of text were reviewed by the council (to check for anything “problematic”) then compiled into a large book.

The gallery space is taken up with a large white stage where every day two or three sign painters will take requests from visitors, who can choose any piece of text from the book, and create big cardboard signs from them.

20170922_124708-816x612

Sign painters painting and assembling signs (Council House)

20170922_124829(0)-612x816

Signs painted with the word “nothingness” on top of a cabinet (Council House)

On the way to the next exhibition, we stopped to look at the billboards outside the Council House for the #AtlanticProject.  These bring up questions about what it means to be a good neighbour.

20170922_144348-816x612

My favourite of the “Good Neighbour” billboard series

We moved on to KARST for the next WTPATW exhibition.  The artists here are a feminist collective called Claire Fontaine.  As soon as the door opened we smelled burning and smoke.  The first piece here is a huge arrangement of thousands of matches set in the shape of the United Kingdom.  Students from Plymouth College of Art took five days to place the 58500+ matches, and they were set alight on Thursday evening.  The whole place filled up with smoke and parts of the gallery have actually been burned and melted by the process, which was documented.

20170922_152713-612x816

View of Claire Fontaine’s piece from a small hole cut out of a doorway (KARST)

20170922_152701-612x816

Burned matches in Claire Fontaine’s piece (KARST)

The second room is completely filled with red light and here there are neon signs, some of which are animated and seem to respond to each other.

20170922_151525-816x612

A scary message in the second room of Claire Fontaine’s exhibition (KARST)

On the way to the last exhibition we passed by another PAW art piece, The Truth Wall.  This features political letterpress prints by Kiss & Bite Letterpress Studio.

20170922_154536-612x816

The Truth Wall

The last stop on our tour was Plymouth College of Art (PCA).  In the gallery here is a film and sound installation by Matt Stokes.  This piece looks at DIY culture and how live music venues are disappearing locally.  Four local independent bands are filmed playing their music live at the locations of once iconic, but now closed, music venues.

20170922_160841-1305x979

The Bus Station Loonies performing at Plymouth’s recently closed bus station (PCA)

 

Screenshot_2017-09-22-16-20-23.png

Suck My Culture performing in a flat on the site of the old Van Dike Club

Tomorrow I will be going to The Plymouth Athenaeum to take part in PAW myself at the YEA Plymouth table.  We will be giving away free copies of our collaborative zine YEA ’17 which features work by ten young artists aged 11-16.  This is a Plymouth Art Weekender project and our first big project together.  We will also be selling zines by YEA Plymouth members and badges to raise money for future projects together.

You can find out more about these events and exhibitions online on the Plymouth Art Weekender website.

These are my posts from last year’s PAW event:

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 – Day 1

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 – Day 2 – Part 1

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 – Day 2 – Part 2

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 – Day 2 – Part 3

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 – Day 3

Advertisements

Plymouth Art Weekender #PAW17

weekenderflyer-single.jpg

I will be blogging all throughout the Plymouth Art Weekender from different events, so look out for me and keep checking back here!  I will definitely be at the Athenaeum for parts of Saturday, alongside other YEA Plymouth members, giving out free copies of our PAW exclusive zine, YEA ’17, and selling badges. I’m going through the PAW17 map now to decide where else to visit!

Find out more information at these links:

Plymouth Art Weekender #PAW17

YEA ’17 – our free zine featuring 10 young artists!

YEA Plymouth table at the Athenaeum

YEA Plymouth blog

I am also talking about YEA Plymouth and other projects in the new issue of Made In Plymouth so pick up a copy from your friendly neighbourhood art venue!

Plymouth Art Weekender Day 3

The 25th of September was Day 3 of the Plymouth Art Weekender.  Here are links to my earlier posts about the event: Day 1 and Day 2 (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3).

20160925_134834-01-1

My little sister on the merry-go-round at Union Street Party 2016

Day 3 was a Sunday so we relaxed in the morning then headed to the Union Street Party, where last year I took part in my first public participation art project “Painter Pitcher” (organised by Amy Whittingham), with my brother and my dad.  That was a lot of fun and I was looking forward to seeing what was happening at the party this year.  The flyer for the Weekender said there would be a print workshop from Double Elephant and I really wanted to give that a try as I have seen their workshop leaflets at PCA in the past and they look really interesting.

We arrived as a band was setting up on the main stage and a woman from the We Are Plymouth booth asked if we wanted to take part in their photo project to celebrate Plymouth’s people and communities.  Me and my brother were given a small whiteboard to write “We are Plymouth” on (I added a doodle of my own!) and a badge each to wear for our photo.  Unfortunately we didn’t take a photo of our own because we thought they would be posted online but their Instagram account is empty!

20161012_134511-1

Instructions and ticket for Marcella Finazzi’s installation at Sloggett and Son, and my We Are Plymouth badge

We carried on walking around and had fun messing about on a bouncy castle and a rodeo bull.  Next to the bouncy castle were two men playing music with a guitar and drums and they were encouraging members of the public to join in. We watched a woman singing an Elvis song and a few young boys taking turns on the mic and drums, and there was a really great atmosphere around this part of the Party.  Right next door was Sloggett and Son, a shop that sells vintage furniture and they were hosting an installation of instant photos and sound recordings called “What we talk about when we talk about love” by Marcella Finazzi.  We got into line to participate and Marcella gave us a ticket and instructions on what to do.  We wrote about what love means to us on slips of paper and she took our photo for her album.  Being around all the vintage furniture while listening to to the conversations through the headphones made me feel like I was inside someone’s house and part of their family.  When we left we were given another slip of paper each with a ‘love thought’ printed on it.   Mine read “You look good today” and my brother’s read “I believe in you”.

20160925_132919-1

Instant photo of my family by Marcella Finazzi

We heard music and saw people dancing and went to watch for a few minutes then went into the Camper Obscura.  This is a camper van that has been converted into a Camera Obscura that you can sit inside!  We all went in and the man running the van closed the door to shut out the light.  We sat opposite each other on benches and he gave us a big whiteboard to hold flat on our laps.  He opened a hole in the roof with mirrors inside and the reflections of outside the van came in and were shown on the whiteboard.  We had to raise and lower it to get the picture in focus.  I loved this, it was a great experiment and I want to build my own camera obscura at home to better understand how they work.  After we came out the man took a polaroid of us to put on the door alongside pictures of all the other people who had visited that day.  I have my own Instant 1000 Polaroid Land Camera which I used last year for my Max Caulfield cosplay, I don’t know if it works but I am going to save up and get some film (there is a shop on the Barbican called So Perfect Images that sells it) to try out because I really like the way they work and the photos they make, and I’ve been really inspired by the different artists using instant film throughout the Weekender.

20160925_134321

Polaroid in development of my family by the man with the Camper Obscura

 

We looked up and down Union Street again and ate some delicious apples which we hand-turned into long spirals with a little machine, but we couldn’t find the Double Elephant workshop.  We were a little disappointed about that but otherwise we did have a really good time at this years Union Street Party, and I really liked all the different ways there were to get involved in the artworks happening there, however it was time to move on to our next destination.

We drove over to Devonport Guildhall for the Chrysalis exhibition of work by the artists from Flameworks.  All of the artists are making different things, from illustrations to metalwork and jewellery.  One of my favourite displays was “Teapotty” by Peter Heywood which was a selection of teapots made from different materials, including tea leaves, cubes of beech wood, lead, cocktail sticks, and chocolate.  The teapot made of cubes of wood made me think of 3D pixel art brought to life and there was something quite humorous about the collection.  I also liked “Resurrection” by Ati Charlesworth, a mixed media drawing of an old tree trunk with fresh branches and leaves growing from it.  The trunk was drawn with ink dots but Ati used watercolour and gold paint on the leaves and the new wood to bring it to life.  Another drawing I liked was “Shadow of a Previous Life” by Louise Rabey.  This was quite a sad picture based on a memory Louise had of a beloved pet who passed away when she was young.  There were lots more pieces of art on display here, my brother and sister’s favourite was “Salix II” by Piers Edsall which is a big steel musical sculpture with rods that the two of them made a lot of noise with!

Before we left the Guildhall we went downstairs to the cafe and I had a piece of treacle tart that had a layer of jam in it, and looked around Lynsey Johnstone’s exhibition “Floral Abundance”.  Lynsey works with acrylic paints, metallic paints, and glitter to make vibrant and colourful paintings which are full of life.

20160925_145832

Close up on “Summertime Magic” by Lynsey Johnstone

Our next stop was Devonport Live at 56 George Street but unfortunately it was closed, so we carried on to the Royal William Yard and the “Being Human” exhibition.  As soon as we entered we saw the “Participate” installation by Alain Pezard.  This was a collection of porcelain figurines which were quite unsettling, and some of them had been broken and stuck back together in creepy ways.  This has given me some ideas for things I would like to (un)make and it reminded me of Sid’s experiments from Toy Story!  I wish we had known about this piece beforehand because Alain had invited members of the public to bring in their own figurine and I would have liked to do that.

20160925_155757

“Participate” by Alain Pezard

20160925_155731

Creepy figurine holding her own head in Alain Pezard’s “Participate”

I found a lot of this exhibition quite alien to me because I haven’t experienced much fine art before.  Every piece of artwork was different to the other works on display, and there was photography, video, installations, collections, oil paintings, even performance works. I enjoyed another of Alain Pezard’s installations called “Water of the World”, which is a range of bottles of water collected and sent to him over 32 years by participants from all over the world.

20160925_155923

“Water of the World” by Alain Pezard

Another one of my favourites was “Devon Words” by Caitlin Hennessy.  Caitlin is interested in old words that are disappearing from our language as it evolves.  Caitlin talked to us about her research and the meanings of the words she had chosen were sometimes quite funny but sometimes there wasn’t a better word for what was being described, for example we found out that a ‘griggle’ is a small apple left on it’s tree!  I liked this piece so much I bought a small book of words hand-printed (and signed for me!) by Caitlin.

 

20160925_162907

“Devon Words” collected by Caitlin Hennessy

20160925_163134

A page from one of Caitlin Hennessy’s printed books of old words

Before we left RWY we popped into Martin Bush’s gallery of oil paintings.  Martin creates huge bright and warmly coloured abstract art inspired by jazz music and landscapes, and influenced by Matisse and Jackson Pollock.  Martin’s paintings are really beautiful and full of energy and we all really enjoyed our visit to his gallery.

And that was the end of my Art Weekender! I got to see such a wide variety of art but there were still exhibitions I couldn’t fit in, in particular I was sad that I didn’t make it to the Plymouth Arts Centre or the Karst Gallery.  I’m really looking forward to seeing more exhibitions by local artists at the next Plymouth Art Weekender in 2017 and especially finding out what opportunities there are for members of the public and young artists like me to experience being part of the creation of different artworks for the festival.

Plymouth Art Weekender Day 2, Part 3!

20160924_165537

For the last part of Saturday I went to Ocean Studios at Royal William Yard.  We started upstairs at Emerge which is “a communal workspace for artists and creative businesses.”  I looked at Esin Forster’s ocean inspired clay pieces and paintings, and I really liked her character design and marker work.  I looked through one of her sketchbooks and found comic style drawings of adventurous characters and they were full of energy.  I met Gabriella Van Der Stelt who was working on vivid and warm feeling acrylic paintings of fruit in bowls and buildings.  Gabriella was very friendly and I looked her up online afterwards, she also does manga and videogame influenced painting and drawing.  I really liked the open space of Emerge studios and can imagine how peaceful it must be to have an area like that to work in.

We went into Lisa Stokes‘ studio and talked to her daughter.  Lisa paints large oil paintings which are dark and ominous.  Along the corridor, Mary Hick does linocut printing of animals and insects.  Her work is intricate and she patiently carves out every blade of grass and hair.  Sarah Smalldon (instagram)and Shayne House share a studio where she works on her illustration work and he works on his photography.  Sarah showed us her brightly coloured and cheery pictures of houses and buildings, and her hand-decorated plates and furniture.  She primes the surface and then draws on them with Uni Posca pens.  I am going to try this on some of my own things and for cosplay.  Shayne has been working with pin prick photography and talked us through the process.  He takes photos and vintage postcards and pricks them with an awl to highlight certain parts, then places the photo on a lightbox and photographs them again.  He said he has been inspired by Amy Friend.  Pin prick photography gives a really beautiful effect and I recommend you visit his site and see his work, you can also read the backs of the vintage postcards he has collected to work on.  I also met Stella in their studio who is a young artist with similar tastes to me, and who I would like to meet again and maybe collaborate with.

20160927_155920-1

Items I collected on my visit, showing (clockwise from top left): Ocean Studios flyer; oil paintings by Lisa Stokes; mixed media on canvas by Teresa Pemberton; wire sculpture by Nikki Taylor; business cards from Martyn Cross, Annette Daly and Melanie Cassidy; jewellery by Rachel Darbourne; glass and concrete sculpture by Matt Tomas; and linocut print by Mary Hick.

There are so many other artists at Ocean Studios and many of them were happy to talk to us.  Matt Tomas works on contemporary sculpture, mixing concrete and glass.  He showed us the moulds he uses to create glass spikes.  Rachel Darbourne makes jewellery from colourful plastic sheets, similar to that used in plastic bags.  She folds and bends lots of tiny pieces to make shapes that look like carnations or coral, or Chinese dragon costumes.  She also makes art from dismantling teddy bears!   Teresa Pemberton is a mixed media artist whose work is inspired by Devon and Cornwall.  We looked at her canvases which included oil paints, wire, bits of metal and other found objects.  We didn’t meet her unfortunately but the two ladies in her studio were very welcoming, and her artwork has a sense of being welcoming and natural.

The last studio on the top floor we went to belonged to Martyn Cross.  Martyn works with unusual materials in experimental ways, and he has ironed plastic bags and shaped them into the shape of  a hat and a shoe.  He collects old knitting patterns, cuts parts of them away and rearranges them to create strange images.  I really liked his simple character drawings that were framed at the side of the studio.  Downstairs  Annette Daly and Melanie Cassidy share a glasswork studio where they make jewellery and decorations.  We quickly looked into a couple of other studios and glimpsed some acrylic paintings we liked by Mike Hanny, but the Studios were closing and so it was time to leave.  Looking online afterwards I found out that the paintings I liked are part of a series called ‘The Architects Glittering Plan’, and involve lots of patterned coloured ‘worms’ on a black background.  I would love a poster of one of these on my wall.

 

Outside me and my brother took part in a ‘sketch-a-thon’ and spoke to Nikki Taylor about her wire mesh sculptures.  Nikki uses sketches, photos and exact measurements to create life-size sculptures of human bodies in motion.  There was so much more I didn’t have time to see in the few hours I was there, as Ocean Studios is filled with all sorts of artists and craftspeople.  The Royal William Yard is a very peaceful place to be and I’d like to spend more time there.

In my next post I will write about the Union Street Party, the exhibitions at Devonport Guildhall, and the fine art exhibition also at Royal William Yard.

Links to previous posts on this years Weekender:

Day 1

Day 2, Part 1

Day 2, Part 2

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 Day 2, Part 2

Click here for my post on Weekender Day 1

Click here for my post on Weekender Day 2, Part 1

20160924_143530

The menu at Prime Cafe Bar

After a quick look around PCA we went to Prime Cafe Bar to see the Nomads exhibition  by Patrick Strode and Viktor Toth.  Patrick’s surreal illustrations felt lonely and I like how he uses colour.  In his comic page he mixed pinky-purple-orange watercolours for the background, in his other pictures on display he used just one colour for the background or made two spots of light, but everything else he left untouched.  I’d like to try this in my own drawings because his work is really striking.  I loved Viktor’s illustration of a woman in a dress wearing a headdress which looked like it was done with ballpen.  His pictures are dark and dramatic and seemed like they might be concept art for video games.  He also uses colour in confined areas, surrounded by shades of grey and black.

I had Rose Lemonade which tasted a bit like turkish delight, and a slice of banana toffee cake which was soft, squishy and delicious.  My mum had an iced mocha in a pretty glass and she says it is the best iced coffee she has had all year.  Prime Cafe Bar is a really nice space, it is comfy and there are shelves of books and games you can read and play.  We looked at a book about Japan and a Far Side book of cartoons.

20160924_144538

A photo showing the texture of Rebecca Williams Altschmerz (work in progress)

 

We moved on to the Fine Art Building of PCA to the exhibition Nothing Bad Will Happen.  We were greeted by Bethany Smiles who was showing her acrylic painting set Icons.  The objects on display were really diverse but seemed very personal to the artists.  For example,  Angela Hilton gathers discarded personal materials for her work, and I’ve Measured Out My Life In Coffee Spoons is a collection of 2 years worth of her own disposable contact lenses, stacked and hung from the ceiling on a piece of invisible thread.  My favourite pieces here were two acrylic paintings (one is a work in progress) by Rebecca Williams which were so filled with texture I wanted to stroke the canvas.  I also really liked Steve Brown’s political posters which I stopped at for a long time to try and examine every detail, and Sam Turner’s installation Form Of A Cyclical Construct which uses found containers and zip ties and made me think of a huge plastic dragon.

It was time for us to travel across town to Ocean Studios at Royal William Yard, and I will write about that in Part 3..

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 Day 2, Part 1

20160924_134639-1

Chrissy Vale’s character designs at Masters 2016 (Plymouth College Of Art) – chrissyvale.co.uk

This morning I went to my second week of NA&DSC and we went on a trip to see the exhibitions at the Plymouth College of Art and Plymouth University.

First we visited the Masters 2016 room and it was full of intriguing work.  The highlights for me as a young artist interested in illustration were Chrissy Vale’s colourful comic characters which have a clean and simple style and Ashley Turner’s Onnen Design prints of animals and plants in pen, pencil, watercolour and gouache.  I also liked Tim Gundry’s drone photography photos, which give an unusual view on ordinary buildings so that they look like they came out of a videogame.

Before we went to Plymouth University, we stopped by PCA’s This Is Now exhibition which had retro TVs showing videos from the 1980’s.  Some of them were catchy music videos which I really enjoyed.

20160924_124130-1

Clare Thornton’s sculptures at Edge Of Collapse (Plymouth University) – clarethornton.com

Our group then headed to the University’s Peninsula Gallery which had an exhibit called Searching for Genius by Douglas Gordon.  Most of the art was quite creepy, especially the photographs of people with the eyes and mouths burnt away.  Upstairs there was another exhibit called Edge of Collapse which featured art by Clare Thornton, Victoria Walters (her page was unfortunately offline when I checked) and Jamie House, who was my film tutor for my art group last year.  Victoria was there when we visited so she talked to us about the different pieces and explained how her sculpture was inspired by ground swells in the ocean.  Clare’s work only used only a few different colours in clay and leather but they looked beautiful.  My favourite piece of hers was made using jelly moulds!  Jamie’s piece was made using an electrical drawing machine, and the result was a unique pattern scorched into paper.

We went back to the pre-degree centre where I met up with my mum and the two of us headed straight back out to more Weekender events, which I will cover in my next post as I have seen so much today I can’t fit it all in here!

If you haven’t read it yet, here is my post on Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 Day 1.

Plymouth Art Weekender 2016 Day 1

20160923_132433-1

This weekend is Plymouth Art Weekender, an annual event lasting three days and celebrating visual arts in Plymouth.

 

This afternoon I started by meeting some friends in the Radiant Gallery’s exhibition called Dog Show.  The first thing we saw when we entered the gallery were three enormous dog sculptures.  Snoopy dog is a scaled-up model of a Fisher Price toy from the 1960’s by Liam Ainscough.  I had never seen the toy before but it is a cute design and has a fun springy tail.  The other two sculptures were made from paper mache and had wheels on the bottoms and leads attached around their necks so that visitors can take them for walks around the gallery.

20160923_134349-1

We walked to the back of the room and found a display of bowls holding dog biscuits.  This section was an interesting way of gathering information about visitors, as we had to answer the questions on the wall by putting a biscuit into one of the bowls.  We had to work out how old we were in dog years, and I found out that 1 dog year is worth 7 human years.

There was a dressing up corner containing a coat rack of costumes and creepy dog masks.  I dressed up in different outfits and posed to have my pictures taken.  It was really funny coming up with bizarre combinations and my favourite was a shiny gold jacket, a pug mask and a top hat.  I looked at the photos by Emma Saffy Wilson of people with their dogs or groups of friends playing with costumes, and it felt good to see the happy relationships in them.

20160923_132203-1

We stayed at Rumpus Cosy afterwards and I had a strawberry and vanilla cordial fizz and a slice of blueberry cake.  The cafe is pretty and the cake was tasty.  If you would like to visit yourself, Dog Show will be at the Radiant Gallery until the 30th of September.

We moved on to the Barbican and stopped at 40RTY5IVE Southside, a shop which sells lots of different things by local designer-makers.  We saw two of Piers Edsall’s Krakens and pottery by Christina Peters.  I really liked some of the prints that I saw here by Jan Brewerton (twitter) which have a unique style.  We went into Only Originals and it was filled with tons and tons of Sue Wills’s paintings, some still in progress.  I spoke to her daughter Christie Wills (instagram) who is an illustrator studying at Plymouth University and who had some of her own work on display.  Her artwork is inspired by animals and uses unusual techniques.  She made one print using an extremely carefully cut out paper elephant, and she has dripped and layered watercolours to make colourful paintings.

Lastly we went to Barbican New Street Artists.  Their studio is on the top floor of the building up lots of steep winding stairs.  Here we talked to Glyn White who does extremely personal paintings, some with shocking stories behind them.  The painting of a shore he was working on was inspired by an accident he had where he broke his foot and wasn’t able to go surfing for many months.  Glyn is really friendly and I recommend a visit to his studio to hear his stories.  I also looked at paintings of pubs by another artist in the studio, Dave Crocker, and he told us about his plein air painting at weddings.

I had a good day and I’m looking forward to the rest of the weekend.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: