Art, reviews and thoughts from a young artist in Plymouth, UK.

Posts tagged ‘Rachel Darbourne’

Radius: 50mi at Ocean Studios

Last week I went to the third Home Grown exhibition at Ocean Studios, called Radius: 50mi featuring “contemporary jewellery and small scale metal artefacts”.  Multiple artists contributed to the exhibition.

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Necklace by Jodie Hansen

Jodie Hansen’s inspiration comes from nature and local scenery.  Her jewellery has a fragile, unique, and slightly eerie quality that is beguiling.

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Necklace by Tracey Falvey

Tracey Falvey’s inspiration is “drawn from sculptural and architectural structures” and she uses recycled silver.  I really liked the contrast between the dark or silver outside and the bright colours painted on the inside.

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Earrings by Maria Whetman

Maria Whetman’s jewellery uses clusters of hand-made jewels and shards of silver.  Her work seems dark and opulent.

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Jewellery by Rachel Darbourne

Rachel Darbourne “lovingly murders” cuddly toys and makes jewellery from the pieces.  Her work is grisly, playful, and highly peculiar.  I was lucky enough to meet Rachel at the Ocean Studios Open Day during last year’s Weekender.

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Artefact by Noah Taylor

Noah Taylor has a love of “things”.  He deconstructs objects made from brass, bronze, and copper,  then puts them back together to create new artefacts.  The finished products have an abundance of life and character, and remind me of the creatures in the film Return to Oz.

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Necklace by Stacey West

Stacey West’s award winning jewellery is inspired by found treasures and “the raw organic Cornwall coastline and rugged landscape”.  Her collection “Interlocking Strata” is tactile and interactive and encourages the wearer to play with their jewellery.

 

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Necklace by Katy Luxton

Katy Luxton is inspired by “mathematical models, geometric shapes, and the interwoven curves, circles and figures produced by a spirograph”.  She incorporates 3D printing and hand-dyeing to make colourful and exciting jewellery.

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Jewellery by Chloe O’Brien

Chloe O’Brien is inspired by discarded postcards “capturing this gentleness of the past to reflect and honor the beauty of these traditional forms of language, communication and handwriting”.  She cuts and reforms vintage postcards and postage stamps to look like precious stones.

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Jewellery by Peter Reeves

Peter Reeves is inspired by organic textures including tree bark and beehives.  I really liked his beehive ring which has a pattern of interlocking hexagons with a tiny silver bee crawling over.

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Jewellery by Victoria Sewart

Victoria Sewart’s inspirations for her work on display are “the aesthetics of form, structure and material composition” and the collection “investigates the properties of stainless steel mesh”.  Her jewellery looks like gold and silver ribbons trapped in time and movement.

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Jewellery by Nicola Hurst

Nicola Hurst’s inspiration comes from “architecture, simple shapes and everyday living”. Her work uses intersecting shapes and I think they resemble ancient symbols.

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Artwork by Sam Photic

Sam Photic is inspired by “the isolated Devonshire landscape and the continued encroachment of society upon it”.  His pieces of abstract work on display are metal squares and circles bolted together with strips of colour.  I think the central piece in my photo could make a striking album cover.

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Rings by Leigh Mason

Leigh Mason “references form, scale, texture and colour”. and her work has been featured in Vogue magazine.  I liked her unusual square-shaped rings with oversized pastel coloured gems.

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Jewellery by Ana Simoes

Ana Simoes is inspired by “the richness of Ana’s home country’s history, landscape and architecture, particularly by its connection to the sea and the unknown”.  Some of the work she had displayed looked like tiny planets and moons.

I really enjoyed this exhibition which was filled with so many different types of jewellery from local artists.  I am currently working on making jewellery with found seaglass and recycled silver with my National Saturday Art and Design Club at PCA led by my tutor Kate Marshall and this exhibition has given me lots of inspiration.

Read my post about Week 1 of the Home Grown exhibition here

Read my post about Week 2 of the Home Grown exhibition here

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Plymouth Art Weekender Day 2, Part 3!

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For the last part of Saturday I went to Ocean Studios at Royal William Yard.  We started upstairs at Emerge which is “a communal workspace for artists and creative businesses.”  I looked at Esin Forster’s ocean inspired clay pieces and paintings, and I really liked her character design and marker work.  I looked through one of her sketchbooks and found comic style drawings of adventurous characters and they were full of energy.  I met Gabriella Van Der Stelt who was working on vivid and warm feeling acrylic paintings of fruit in bowls and buildings.  Gabriella was very friendly and I looked her up online afterwards, she also does manga and videogame influenced painting and drawing.  I really liked the open space of Emerge studios and can imagine how peaceful it must be to have an area like that to work in.

We went into Lisa Stokes‘ studio and talked to her daughter.  Lisa paints large oil paintings which are dark and ominous.  Along the corridor, Mary Hick does linocut printing of animals and insects.  Her work is intricate and she patiently carves out every blade of grass and hair.  Sarah Smalldon (instagram)and Shayne House share a studio where she works on her illustration work and he works on his photography.  Sarah showed us her brightly coloured and cheery pictures of houses and buildings, and her hand-decorated plates and furniture.  She primes the surface and then draws on them with Uni Posca pens.  I am going to try this on some of my own things and for cosplay.  Shayne has been working with pin prick photography and talked us through the process.  He takes photos and vintage postcards and pricks them with an awl to highlight certain parts, then places the photo on a lightbox and photographs them again.  He said he has been inspired by Amy Friend.  Pin prick photography gives a really beautiful effect and I recommend you visit his site and see his work, you can also read the backs of the vintage postcards he has collected to work on.  I also met Stella in their studio who is a young artist with similar tastes to me, and who I would like to meet again and maybe collaborate with.

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Items I collected on my visit, showing (clockwise from top left): Ocean Studios flyer; oil paintings by Lisa Stokes; mixed media on canvas by Teresa Pemberton; wire sculpture by Nikki Taylor; business cards from Martyn Cross, Annette Daly and Melanie Cassidy; jewellery by Rachel Darbourne; glass and concrete sculpture by Matt Tomas; and linocut print by Mary Hick.

There are so many other artists at Ocean Studios and many of them were happy to talk to us.  Matt Tomas works on contemporary sculpture, mixing concrete and glass.  He showed us the moulds he uses to create glass spikes.  Rachel Darbourne makes jewellery from colourful plastic sheets, similar to that used in plastic bags.  She folds and bends lots of tiny pieces to make shapes that look like carnations or coral, or Chinese dragon costumes.  She also makes art from dismantling teddy bears!   Teresa Pemberton is a mixed media artist whose work is inspired by Devon and Cornwall.  We looked at her canvases which included oil paints, wire, bits of metal and other found objects.  We didn’t meet her unfortunately but the two ladies in her studio were very welcoming, and her artwork has a sense of being welcoming and natural.

The last studio on the top floor we went to belonged to Martyn Cross.  Martyn works with unusual materials in experimental ways, and he has ironed plastic bags and shaped them into the shape of  a hat and a shoe.  He collects old knitting patterns, cuts parts of them away and rearranges them to create strange images.  I really liked his simple character drawings that were framed at the side of the studio.  Downstairs  Annette Daly and Melanie Cassidy share a glasswork studio where they make jewellery and decorations.  We quickly looked into a couple of other studios and glimpsed some acrylic paintings we liked by Mike Hanny, but the Studios were closing and so it was time to leave.  Looking online afterwards I found out that the paintings I liked are part of a series called ‘The Architects Glittering Plan’, and involve lots of patterned coloured ‘worms’ on a black background.  I would love a poster of one of these on my wall.

 

Outside me and my brother took part in a ‘sketch-a-thon’ and spoke to Nikki Taylor about her wire mesh sculptures.  Nikki uses sketches, photos and exact measurements to create life-size sculptures of human bodies in motion.  There was so much more I didn’t have time to see in the few hours I was there, as Ocean Studios is filled with all sorts of artists and craftspeople.  The Royal William Yard is a very peaceful place to be and I’d like to spend more time there.

In my next post I will write about the Union Street Party, the exhibitions at Devonport Guildhall, and the fine art exhibition also at Royal William Yard.

Links to previous posts on this years Weekender:

Day 1

Day 2, Part 1

Day 2, Part 2

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