Events and Exhibitions, Personal Work

Plymouth Art Weekender 2017 – Day 3

Today my plan was to visit as many of the Plymouth Art Weekender events as possible before the festival ended.  I wanted to make sure I took part in some of the different art workshops around Plymouth, so finding venues with workshops happening was my highest priority, and I had two boxes left of zines to take with me.  I sat down with my family and we made a plan together.

Our first stop was Ocean Studios.  I dropped off some YEA ’17 zines in the cafe area and had a look at the portrait exhibition U + ME = US by Jojo on the way to the Made In Plymouth Maker’s Table, where we created papier-mache people for a family sculpture.  I haven’t worked with paper-mache much before, and though gluing layers and layers of paper over each other was messy and fiddly, I had a really good time.  While I was there, lots of families and young children came and had a go at making the sculptures, and the atmosphere was friendly and active, but also relaxed.  We left our paper people with there to be arranged later into the bigger sculpture.

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Making papier-mache people at the Ocean Studios Maker’s Table
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Me with my papier-mache sculpture

I wanted to see Laura Edmunds’ drawing and sound exhibition A Soft Introduction upstairs, so I left the workshop early to check it out.  I spoke to Laura and learned that the sounds had been recorded on very sensitive microphones placed around her body while she drew and painted her pieces.  There was a circle of speakers and I stood in the centre to listen, the sounds were soothing and mysterious, and reminded me of the sea.  On display were around 69 of Laura’s drawings, and she described drawing them as almost like making musical notation.  I thought they looked like a visual representation of her subconscious train of thoughts, and the overall feeling was serene.

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A section of nine of Laura’s drawings from A Soft Introduction

I made my way back downstairs to join Sue Lewry’s monoprinting workshop.  I was given a small rectangular plate which I inked with a roller, then I arranged pieces of textured wallpaper, cardboard and other materials on top of it, and each piece I inked with a different colour.  I placed it carefully for registration with a piece of paper on top then it was put through a rolling printing press.  This workshop was more quick paced than the earlier one as lots of people were around the table using the inks and press, but it was still a lot of fun.  I like monoprinting and would like to try incorporating it into my illustration work in the future.

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My monoprint from Sue Lewry’s printing workshop

I headed off from Ocean to my next destination which was to Plymouth School of Creative Arts (PSCA).  I delivered the last box of YEA ’17 zines here, and went up the stairs to visit the exhibitions.  First I looked at Three In One, an exhibition by Janet Sainsbury, Andy Coldrey, and Charlie O’Sullivan.  Their art worked well together, and I liked Charlie’s sculpture of paper houses and paintings made on a long scroll of old book pages.

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Sculpture by Charlie O’Sullivan for Three In One at PSCA
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One of my favourite paintings in Three In One, by Janet Sainsbury
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My favourite piece of Andy Coldrey’s in Three In One

We then headed up to Janine Rook’s inkblot painting workshop.  Janine was one of my art tutors during my first Saturday Arts Club at Plymouth College of Art, so it was good to see her again and tell her about my new college course.  This workshop was also popular with families, and there was a big display of inkblot paintings from lots of children that had taken part as well as more paintings on all the flat surfaces around.  I used pipettes to carefully place a small number of coloured ink drops on my paper and then folded it down the middle to create patterns.  I learned that inkblot painting is called klecksography and enjoyed the peaceful atmosphere with even the smallest children very quietly concentrating on their pieces.

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Inkblot paintings by Janine Rook
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Several families enjoying the klecksography workshop with Janine Rook

On the same floor as the inkblots was one of the highlights of the day, Funny Blind Date, an exhibition of collages sent to Plymouth from around the world that has been collected together by Object Recordings.  Everything in the collection is an analogue collage, meaning it was put together physically using magazines, posters etc, and scissors and glue, rather than being produced digitally.  There was work from eleven different artists and I was surprised how each one had a very different style and mood to their work.  Some of the pieces were very humourous or witty, and others were more serious or political.  I have never been to an exhibition of collages before and Funny Blind Date was inspirational, showing me that collage can be just as visually interesting and meaningful as drawing and painting.

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This collage from Funny Blind Date made me think about city life and our aspirations
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This collage from Funny Blind Date is interesting because it is made of one full poster, with the pieces rearranged

I had to move on but I paid a quick visit to the Union Street Party just around the corner.  It was smaller than previous years and the road hadn’t been closed off, but even the rain hadn’t stopped people gathering to play drums and dance.  I was disappointed that I didn’t find any participatory art projects here this year as in previous years I have really enjoyed that element of the Party, but it was good to see that even in the rain Plymothians can have a good time!

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It was hard to get a non-blurry shot because everyone at the Union Street Party was so energetic and active!

I also stopped to have a look at Bouys and Girls by Mary Trapp in PSCA’s playground.  This installation features wire and foam sculptures of children wearing lifejackets, suspended over water alongside orange buoys.  It made me think of public information films, on first look the figures look like they are having fun, jumping or dancing, but as I spent more time looking at them they looked more like they were struggling against currents or trying to escape.  I thought it was a really interesting piece of art and I would like to see where Mary takes it next, as she suggested that she would change the arrangement when she moves it to new locations.

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Bouys and Girls by Mary Trapp

My next stop was to the Park Bench Reader by Bram Thomas Arnold, who was going to read from Jurassic Park, but unfortunately my family made a mistake and went to the wrong location so I missed this event.  I was disappointed as it sounded like a fun piece but I am going to look out for Bram’s future projects.  I then went to the Athenaeum to take part in a zine workshop from Make Stuff/Drink Stuff, but unfortunately that had been cancelled!  I think I need to pay more attention to messages on social media next year so I can keep up with the changes that can happen in a big event like the Art Weekender.  Fortunately there were other things to do at the venue so I watched some of Rhys Morgan’s video and sound collage Platform, revisited the Handling Collection, and listened for a while to some poetry on stage (about pants!) for Tears In Rain.  There was a real variety in the building!

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The Travel Wallet by David Shrigley, my favourite piece in the Penryn Handling Collection at the Athenaeum

I was feeling quite tired by now but I really wanted to see some more of the things on my list.  I headed for Studio 102 which had a really interesting sounding exhibition in the PAW programme, I Don’t Believe Birmingham Exists by Adrian BishopI am really glad that I decided to keep going because as soon as I entered I felt energised by Adrian’s paintings.  This is a collection of absurd beliefs illustrated in ink, and the paintings are colourful and energetic and got us all talking and really actively engaged by the work.  Adrian’s exhibition is on until the 8th of October and I would recommend everyone interested in illustration or political and satirical artwork visits the gallery to experience it.  (I only just realised I have seen work by Adrian at Studio 102 before and wrote about it here)

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Ink painting for I Don’t Believe Birmingham Exists by Adrian Bishop in Studio 102

Our last stop was Plymouth Arts Centre as it was just around the corner and I wanted to have a better look at the Dwell installation upstairs.  There was a peaceful tented area with cushions and books by Niamh Lily Wimperis, and a quiet and contemplative arrangement of a dresser with items on top where everything was painted white, by Megan Kathryn Heywood.  I have a copy of their zine (also called Dwell) which I plan to read later.

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Niamh Lily Wimperis’s peaceful interactive installation in PAC
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Dwell, the zine

I had another look around PAC which has been repainted for Ciara Phillips’ work which is ongoing and will be added to over the course of the exhibition.  I plan to visit regularly to check on it and see how it grows as she works with local groups of people.

That is the end of my Weekender posts this year!  I didn’t manage to get to all the things I wanted to, but some exhibitions are still available to visit so I will try to get to them.  I wish the Weekender was on for longer, some of the things I missed but really wished I’d had a chance to get to were Rosie King’s G O N E (preserve us) and the Flameworks Open Day.  I also missed Sketch 2017 at PCA but luckily that is on until 6th October so I will make sure I go before then.

I hope everyone else had as good a Weekender as me and I hope to get even more involved in PAW 2018!

Here are my previous posts about PAW 2017:

Day One

Day Two

 

 

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Events and Exhibitions

Uptown Junk at Studio 102

Yesterday I visited Studio 102 to view its new exhibition, Uptown Junk.  Studio 102 is an art gallery and shop with studios above supporting emerging artists in Plymouth and it is based on Vauxhall Street.

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Illustration incorporating upcyled plastic by Adrian Bishop

Uptown Junk is the current exhibition at Studio 102.  The exhibition showcases “upcycled and innovative artwork from the local community” and the pieces are being auctioned to raise money for the marine conservation society.  This piece by Adrian Bishop draws attention to the danger to living creatures caused by dumping plastics in the ocean.

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Beautiffly Twisted by Marcus Crandon

This piece by Marcus Crandon is a slimy looking skull tangled with what seems to be real hair.  It looks like the rotted remains of a pirate sentenced to death for his crimes…

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Artwork by Ryan Arthurs

I think these mutated characters by Ryan Arthurs are intended to make us consider the impact pollution has on the environment and living creatures, including ourselves.

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Artwork by Ryan Arthurs

I really like the colours and scratched away effect on these pieces, also by Ryan Arthurs.

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Upcycled fashion by Mariana Lopez

This hat and bowtie by Mariana Lopez are upcycled from marine debris washed up in Cornwall.  In 1997 a ship containing tonnes of lego pieces sank off the coast of Cornwall, pieces are still being washed up today.  I visited Liskeard & District Museum earlier this year and enjoyed their Plastic Age exhibition about plastics dumped in the ocean where they have collected lots of these lego pieces and other toys.

Uptown Junk is on throughout this week (until the 26th) Monday to Friday, 12-6pm at Studio 102.  If any of the artists above would like me to add more information or links please get in touch with me @midnakit on instagram.